Was it something I said?

What is the chief end of man?–to get rich. In what way?–dishonestly if we can; honestly if we must. Who is God, the one only and true? Money is God. God and Greenbacks and Stock–father, son, and the ghost of same–three persons in one; these are the true and only God, mighty and supreme… Mark Twain,
– “The Revised Catechism” 9/27/1871

There are few inventions, that is, there are few real inventions that aren’t prevarications. What we take as being a stroke of genius in reality, most times I think, is nothing more than habitual discovery. .  long experimentation, hard work and the study of the recursion of others doing trial after experiment after assay after trial all over again. Rey discovers thermoluminescence  in supramolecular dilutions of theoretically pure water, complaints by pseudoscientists that

They say Heaven conspires for those who know what they want. Sometimes there are inspirations that seem to dart from Heaven, come out of nowhere. They are coincidences with impossible denominators, as if to lead us on this dark and misty road and keep trudging on past the warm and lighted inn.

This last evening I experienced one.

An amazing coincidence. Something to spur me on. Whether or not it’s relevant to my efforts is hard to know.
You see, I’ve been getting criticisms over my approach to the subject of homeopathy. Some people have suggested that I’ve been unprofessional, in a somewhat mean and derogatory way, in response to my critics.
And sometimes, in reflection, I feel compelled to agree. I should be kinder. I should be nicer. It’s not like me to tell a man he’s so stupid he must think a fire engine is something that automatically starts fires, tiptoes in the drugstore so as to not wake up the sleeping pills. I’m the type of man who pets cats, drives around squirrels and is nice to telephone solicitors.
I try to be friendly and smile. But in the case of homeopathy, I feel I am faced with sinister forces. Evil. The bane of humanity.

Allopathy.

Now this may seem a little paranoid to those unwilling to take the time to verify it, but it’s true.
Well, the ground work for this miracle started out earlier today when one of the people in our online homeopathy discussion group posted a list of salaries of the major drug company chief executive officers (CEOs). I took an immediate interest in it because of late I’ve been wondering who the CEO of Pfizer is, the world’s largest manufacturer of allopathic drugs.
Allopathy is the form of medicine that produces effects different from or opposite of those produced by the disease. Allo means variation, departure from the normal, or reversal, exactly what you experience when you go to an allopath.

I live my life to be with you.
No one can do the things you do.
Anything you want, you got it.
Anything you need, you got it.
Anything at all, you got it.

Roy Orbison, You Got It Writers: Jeff Lynne, Roy Orbison and Tom Petty.

Hahnemann, who was first trained as an allopathic physician, developed homeopathy as a response to the compulsive abuse and failure of allopathy.
I wonder, how many people does allopathy murder a year? Look at their drugs, their failures, their lawsuits. Poisons happily advertised on TV that produce symptoms worse than the disease. TV ads one year that recommend you ask your doctor (he’s been bribed) and the subject of massive lawsuits and fines the next. Then it happens all over again.

Ladies and gentlemen, this has been going on centuries. And they call homeopaths quacks? Time to get up on your hindlegs and stop these criminals!

The term iatrogenesis means brought forth by a healer, from the Greekἰατρός (iatros, “healer”) and γένεσις (genesis, “origin”); as such, in its earlier forms, it could refer to good or bad effects.

Since at least the time of Hippocrates, people have recognized the potentially damaging effects of medical intervention. “First do no harm” (primum non nocere) is a primary Hippocratic mandate in modern medical ethics. Iatrogenic illness or death caused purposefully or by avoidable error or negligence on the healer’s part became a punishable offense in many civilizations.[29]  iatrogenesisWikipedia

Addictive drugs, killer drugs. First one’s always free.

Statini drugs, Vioxx, Avandia, anti-diabetic drugs, Yaz, Yasmin birth control, thalidomide babies, bloodletting, unnecessary surgery, overdoses, mercury poisoning, crippling vaccines, oxycontin, opium, intellectual property rights, patent medicine, molecular synthesis, opiates, Fetanyl, the list goes on and on. Recently Pfizer was fined billions of dollars for racketeering. RICO. GlaxoSmithKline was fined hundreds of millions for violations. It’s amazing. But the public puts up with it, because  black propaganda campaigns have convinced them that there is no alternative.

“Homeopathy?” they say,  “Come now, it’s just plain water, placebos, ineffective” . .  the literature of course proves all of that false. Homeopathy poses a greater threat to the allopathic drug industry than do government fines and regulation, not just because it works, but because it works better. Government simply runs a catch and release program for allopaths, on the basis that that’s all we got for a desperately ill clientele.
It’s what I’ve characterized in my columns of the past week as the “Evil Empire,”
It’s what I write about. The charges may sound excessive, but they’re true. And, as you will see, how quickly they fruit. So I pick out a few targets to expose. Looming on the list was the CEO of Pfizer, the world’s sickest, deadliest corporation. There are few that would outrank it in the evil index. I just hadn’t gotten around to finding out who he is . . or was,  as the case may be.

According to the list, the CEO of Pfizer is an attorney by the name of Jeff Kindler.
I eventually got off my mental hind end and looked him up.
According to Wikipedia, “Jeffrey Kindler graduated summa cum laude from Tufts University and magna cum laude from Harvard in 1980. He clerked for Supreme Court Justice William J. Brennan Jr. and worked at the law firm Williams & Connolly in Washington, D.C. He was Vice President and Senior Counselor for General Electric Co. Executive Vice President of Corporate Relations and General Counsel for McDonald’s, President of Partner Brands which owns Boston Market and    Chipotle Mexican Grill, a sandwich lawyer until 2002, when he moved to Pfizer to serve as General Counsel. Wikipedia says, Kindler’s role at Pfizer quickly took on critical importance as the company faced a vast array of generic assaults on its patents, most notably on the $12 billion drug Lipitor, and the rising threat of counterfeit drugs.”

“The selection of a lawyer to the top post at the world’s largest and most venerable pharmaceutical company highlighted the growing dominance of legal issues in the pharmaceutical industry.”

His salary is . .  or was . . $12.6 million dollars. This may seem like a lot, but it is only a third of the $33.4 million Miles White, CEO of Abbott made, and Abbott isn’t being sued for a billion.

I guess you get what you’re paid for.

Here’s the list of the top 14 drug company CEO salaries from which Jeff‘s salary is taken. It appears to be outdated. Sidney Taurel (9) for instance, has been replaced by John Leichleiter with a salary of only a paltry $1.48 million, although I might have missed a digit:

  1. Miles White – Abbott – $33.4M
    2. Fred Hassan – Schering-Plough – $30.1M
    3. Bill Weldon – Johnson & Johnson – $25.1M
    4. Bob Essner – Wyeth – $24.1M
    5. Robert Parkinson – Baxter – $17.6M
    6. Daniel Vasella – Novartis – $15.5M
    7. Richard Clark – Merck – $14.5M
    8. Frank Baldino – Cephalon – $13.5M
    9. Sidney Taurel – Eli Lilly – $13M
    10. Jeff Kindler – Pfizer – $12.6M
    11. Jim Cornelius – Bristol-Myers Squibb – $11.3
    12. Franz Humer – Roche – $11.1M
    13. Robert Coury – Mylan – $8.5M
    14. Jean-Pierre Garnier – GlaxoSmithKline – $6M

Tonight, lying in bed, I dwelled on this. Allopathy is the form of medicine that homeopathy opposes. The word was coined by Hahnemann, a fluent wordsmith in 10 languages, to describe mainstream medicine.
And these men who oppose us are the extraordinarily wealthy cream of the allopathic crop of drug manufacturers.
An awesome array.
However, there is a huge difference that I see between them and me. I don‘t make money. I‘m just a homeless guy who got lucky, through another wild coincidence . .

. . okay okay, I‘ll get to the one that prompted this piece in a moment.

So, I’m lying in bed, thinking about all of this, and about Jeff Kindler in particular. Unlocked, Golum might wander, “Whereas I may be poor as a church mouse, I have a couple of things he doesn’t have, and that is what sets us miles apart. I possess something that I have a real passion for. I have been let in on the inner circle of a great discovery. The kind of thing they hand out Nobels like door prizes for.”

Yes, if Golum lived, dealt the same hand, he might say,

“I am hated by the people who would be expected to hate me. I for being right, they for being wrong. I am probably one of only a handful of people who understands the mechanical, molecular basis for the action of the homeopathic remedy. I possess a knowledge of a chemistry that is far more advanced than Kindler’s. So in that way I am far more wealthy than he is. What he claims in riches time and thieves will take away, where mine is in Heaven’s store. I am in a Kingdom far above his Evil Empire. For his own sake and everyone else’s who is in his wake, I wish he’d quit, I wish he’d quit defending the indefensible.”

He relieved me of saying it, so I presumptuously turned the radio on and continued to think as the news man called out his rip ‘n’ read for the day’s end. And I thought, this man Kindler, how many lives might be laid at his feet? A civil war’s worth?  How much suffering and death is he responsible for? Could we measure it in holocausts? Or will we have to pay for it in Apocalypses and get change back in Cataclysms?  Would I want that in trade of a wealth that can be taken away in a moment?
What kind of reputation is that?
What would it take to stop this man, to get him to step down?
As I am thinking this the newsman announces that Jeffery Kindler has resigned as CEO of Pfizer. The CEO of the world’s largest drug company has stepped down to “recharge his batteries.”

Jeff Kindler . . quit? Just as I , for the sake of his Soul, was hoping he would?
Now what are the chances of that? That I would be thinking of someone so distant from the common thrall, thinking of his demise, that at that following instant, hear about it on the radio? Is that telepathy, or . .

Was it something I said?

BLAME IT ON GOLUM!

Really. Stupid. People.

Sometimes I wonder about how stupid people can be. I mean there are stupid people, there’s a lot of them, I don‘t suppose they‘d be stupid if they weren‘t people.
I wonder if that choice is made in Heaven. Guy says, “God, I want to live this next reincarnation as a really stupid person. I mean anot just dumb, but a real idiot. The kind of person that acts like he knows something, but doesn‘t really. Arrogant, full of assertions, the kind of jerk who makes up his mind not to see the evidence. The kind of guy who takes a job as a night watchman in a day camp. He’s so stupid he’ll ask what wine goes best with Alpo. If I do that I’ll bring joy into the world by making other people laugh at me.”

Here’s a statement I got from someone calling himself ISayISaw. Now I’m not saying that he’s dumb or drunk necessarily, but something tells me that if he had a brain concussion it would probably classify as a minor injury. He starts out by quoting me. (Boy, is that ever a dumb thing to do):

“Kaviraj and I have given them more than enough time to respond to our challenge. All we have asked of the critics of homeopathy, like Edzard Ernst, John Beddington, Ben Goldacre, Andy Lewis and their dopey proxies, is to please show us the evidence that homeopathic remedies are “placebos.”

Show us just one scientific study that proves it.

Please.

Just one.

That’s all.

It’s not too much to ask . .

Here we are, empty handed. After all this complaining from self-made, tall-talking, wide-walking homeopathy bashers about how homeopathic remedies are nothing more than “placebos” as if they know what a placebo really is, we ask for little evidence of that and they all go quiet on us.

These are the kind of people who fail to check to see if the guns are loaded before putting them to their heads and pulling the trigger.

And then he does. Show us a “study,” that is.

And then he surly says: “You’re not empty-handed but you don’t only seem to pay attention of the poorest quality evidence and the unsupported claims of homeopathy’s fanboys.”

Okay, the nasty remarks aside, this is good. I SayISaw actually coughed up what purports to be a real “scientific” trial here , even if it is just one, and out of hundreds of trials of homeopathy the only one, it’s one of the dumbest things I’ve ever seen, written by the kind of people who are so dim they’d light a match to read a sundial. But look, it’s a hundred times better than the bluff and bluster we get from everybody else.

And published nowhere.
This particular study by Sarah Brien, Laurie Lachance, Phil Prescott, Clare McDermott and George Lewith implies in its title that the effect of homeopathy is a placebo that come from the homeopathic consultation. And I bet they used to save their burned out light bulbs for their darkroom, too. A dark room is the place where these people used to go to retrieve the contents of their photographic memories, but they gave it up because nothing ever developed.
Well, ISayISaw should be congratulated nonetheless for bringing this up. So let’s give a good hand for ISayISaw on the computer keyboard. Let’s give him another good. Actually he needs more than two good hands on the computer keyboard. Maybe he could take his foot out of his mouth and use that.

Title of the study that presumably “proves” homeopathy is a “placebo” is: “Homeopathy has clinical benefits in rheumatoid arthritis patients that are attributable to the consultation process but not the homeopathic remedy: a randomized controlled clinical trial”

Click to access rheumatology.keq234.full.pdf

You can read it yourself, but make sure you’re not operating any heavy equipment if you do because there’s a chance that you might fall over laughing, or start beating your head against the steering wheel.
The objective of this mess was, “To assess whether any benefits from adjunctive homeopathic intervention in patients with RA are due to the homeopathic consultation, homeopathic remedies or both.”
Okay, stop right there. Note the word adjunctive. Adjunct means “something added to another thing but not an essential part of it.”
So now we have to ask an essential part of what? What else is going on in this study they aren’t mentioning here?
The report says this was an exploratory double-blind, randomized placebo-controlled trial conducted from January 2008 to July 2008, in patients with active stable rheumatoid arthritis (RA) receiving conventional therapy.
So in other words, these people were being treated for rheumatoid arthritis using “conventional drugs.”
Just what drugs might those be?
Celebrex? (Pfizer) Yeah, Celebrex. That’s the one advertised on TV showing a smiling young woman flying a kite on the beach, supposedly having a good time.
Here’s the side effects from Celebrex when she gets back from the beach:
“Increased risk of cardiovascular incidents including blood clotting, heart attack and stroke, kidney problems, fluid retention, liver damage, potentially lethal stomach bleeding.”
There’s that young woman again, on her knees in front of the toilet, spitting up blood from lethal stomach bleeding.
Lawsuit!
Or maybe it was Vioxx.
VIOXX BREAKING NEWS:
“Merck & Co., Inc. has agreed to pay $4.85 billion to resolve Vioxx-related claims in which a claimant has suffered a heart attack, sudden cardiac death, or stroke.”
http://www.levinlaw.com/practice-areas/vioxx-information

They’d be better off with a bottle of whiskey and a couple of tickets to a good cage fight. Get ’em on their feet to go somewhere other than the doctor’s office. Maybe what this study was all about was to look for something else to blame it on.

The people who wrote this study are the kind of people who would hand a drowning man a glass of water. I think their last study was to see if people swallowed firecrackers their hair would grow out in bangs.

I mean, do I need to explain this to anybody except for the really, really stupid? I’m surprised this guy ISayISaw can read. He probably has a kid read it to him.
And who did the authors explain this to in order to get it all typed up so nicely? That person deserves the Nobel prize for patience.

This isn’t a test for placebo. I’m not sure what it’s a test for.  Maybe its a secret IQ test. They sure as hell don’t say. Here’s what they did:

Patients were randomized into five groups. Of the five groups, three received a homeopathic consultation (Groups 1 – 3) and two (Groups 4 and 5) did not. The consultation groups were further randomized to individualized treatment (Group 1), a homeopathic complex for RA (Group 2) or placebo (Group 3).
Non-consultation participants were allocated complex (Group 4) or placebo (Group 5); individualized homeopathy can only be prescribed through a consultation.
This study has not disclosed the homeopathic remedies given to Group 1 patients. it says nothing about (group 6) the pill pushers who organized this debacle.

Or (Group 7) the homeoapths. So here comes the homeopath who’s been asked to participate in a study on the effectiveness of homeopathy, and he finds that every one of these people are on racketeceuticals, and they’re having problems with blood clotting, they’re having heart attacks and strokes, kidney problems, they’re puffy from fluid retention, liver damage, and some are having potentially lethal stomach bleeding.

Did the individual consultations focus on totality of symptoms as presented by the patient or the clinical diagnosis as presented by Group 1, or the clinical daignosis as presented by Group 6? Just what was Group 1 given as a result of consulation? A bottle of whiskey and a couple of tickets to a good cage fight. Or how about a carefully folded note that says, “Run for your life.”

Statistically tt appears that Group 6 had a regression to the mean . . mean spirited that is.
So the challenge to Ernst and the Evil Empire still remains after all this time. Provide one trial that proves homeopathy is a “placebo.”
In the meantime, next time you get rheumatoid arthritis, go to a homeopath before the Vioxx pushers get their hands on you, or you might end up in a study like the one ISayISaw regurgitated here. Unless of course you want your heirs to collect on the settlement.

It might save yo a lot of money, time, pain and an early grave.

You know, I bet the people who wrote the Brien “human science experiment” take rulers to bed with them to see how long they sleep. I bet the real facts in this report could have been written on a piece of confetti. I bet they’re so stupid that if we gave them a goldmedal for it they’d have it bronzed.

They’re so stupid that if . . your thoughts go here:__.